Real Lives Captured

Sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are on display at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London. U.S. artist Duane Hanson started creating the realistic figures in the late 1960s.

A sculpture entitled 'Queenie II' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled ‘Queenie II’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled 'Old Couple on a Bench' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A sculpture entitled ‘Old Couple on a Bench’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A sculpture entitled 'House Painter' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled ‘House Painter’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Visitors pass a sculpture entitled 'Baby in Stroller by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Visitors pass a sculpture entitled ‘Baby in Stroller by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A visitor walks past a sculpture entitled 'Children Playing Game' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A visitor walks past a sculpture entitled ‘Children Playing Game’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A sculpture entitled 'Cowboy' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled ‘Cowboy’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Visitors pass a sculpture entitled 'Lunchbreak' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Visitors pass a sculpture entitled ‘Lunchbreak’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled 'Homeless Person' (L) by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled ‘Homeless Person’ (L) by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Visitors (L and R) view a sculpture entitled 'Self-Portrait and Model' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
Visitors (L and R) view a sculpture entitled ‘Self-Portrait and Model’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled 'Queenie II' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled ‘Queenie II’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled 'Flea Market Lady' by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson's lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville
A sculpture entitled ‘Flea Market Lady’ by the late U.S. artist Duane Hanson is exhibited at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, June 1, 2015. Hanson’s lifelike sculptures portraying working-class Americans and overlooked members of society are being brought together in the largest show of his work in Britain since 1997. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Interaction between the artworks, uncannily lifelike, and gallery visitors remains part of the appeal. The London exhibit is the largest British show of Hanson’s art since 1997.

Related Posts

  • Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei to have major London showChinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei to have major London showThe show is being mounted in Ai's absence, since he cannot travel outside China. For decades a critic of the Chinese government's record on free speech and human rights, Ai has been banned […]
  • The next BiennaleThe next BiennaleThe 55th International Art Exhibition titled Il Palazzo Enciclopedico (The Encyclopedic Palace), curated by Massimiliano Gioni and organized by la Biennale di Venezia chaired by Paolo […]
  • Paul Nash painted in the trenches – and I did the same in AfghanistanPaul Nash painted in the trenches – and I did the same in AfghanistanA new Paul Nash show, “the largest … for a generation”, is now open at London’s Tate Britain. It is appropriate timing in this period of World War I memorialising – Paul Nash is one of the […]
  • Banksy and the tradition of destroying artBanksy and the tradition of destroying artPreminda Jacob, University of Maryland, Baltimore CountyWhen the British street artist Banksy shredded his “Girl With Balloon” after it was purchased for US$1.4 million at […]